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The Entrepreneurial Musician with Andrew Hitz

The Entrepreneurial Musician, hosted by former Boston Brass member Andrew Hitz, features interviews with the best and brightest entrepreneurs in the music business today.
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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 28, 2017

This TEM Short is in response to my conversation with The Bulletproof Musician's Noa Kageyama in TEM 101 where he spoke about the power of embracing the process.

"(Music) was a craft that I needed to work on every day to get better at and even now in other things I do, I'm always really kind of geeked out most about the process of getting better at something, sometimes even more than the activity or the craft itself. I think engaging in this continual improvement process is what really intrigues me."

—Noa Kageyama of The Bulletproof Musician

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

 

Jul 22, 2017

TEM 101: Noa Kageyama of the Bulletproof Musician on the Rule of Thirds, Building a Huge Email List and What Entrepreneurs Can Learn From Performance Psychology

Noa Kageyama of The Juilliard School and The Bulletproof Musician talks about being a musical entrepreneur and what we can learn from performance psychology.

What You'll Learn:

  • The details of Noa's fascinating journey through the music journey which included moving to Japan at a young age for six months to study with Dr. Shinichi Suzuki
  • How his desire to get out of orchestra at Oberlin led him to getting a double major in psychology
  • How he built such a great (and popular) website
  • How a friend challenged him to question whether he was approaching his music as a hobby or a profession
  • The importance of promoting yourself in a way that feels good to you and his advice on how to get comfortable promoting yourself
  • How his website and all of his online offerings have morphed over time
  • Noa's advice on getting comfortable with marketing yourself
  • How the Rule of Thirds keeps you focused on the people ready to hear your message
  • How long his average blog post takes to create
  • What as entrepreneurs we can learn from performance psychology
  • How he has built an email list of over 32,000 people
  • The advice Noa would give to a musical entrepreneur who is looking to branch out from "just" teaching or performing

Favorite Quotes:

  • "(Music) was a craft that I needed to work on every day to get better at and even now in other things I do, I'm always really kind of geeked out most about the process of getting better at something, sometimes even more than the activity or the craft itself. I think engaging in this continual improvement process is what really intrigues me."

  • "You have to find a way to market that feels right to you, that feels good to you. Like you're doing a service, not trying to take people's money away from them and cheat them in some way."

  • "The world doesn't become a better place by you hiding what it is that you can contribute."
  • "If you're not interested in promoting yourself, stay in your $#@%ing basement." (—Ben Folds)

Links:

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes (I'm really close!) by leaving a rating and review.

Follow TEM on Instagram and Twitter and Facebook

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo for Pedal Note Media

 

Jul 11, 2017

TEM made it to 100 episodes with thousands of downloads in 77 countries and all 50 states!

 

The iTunes store is littered with podcasts that stop well short of 100 episodes and are never heard from again. The only reason I made it this far is the support of so many of you listeners. Please keep the emails, tweets, Instagram comments, Patreon money and everything else coming. I love hearing from you all. Cheers!

Topics Covered:

7:22 - TEM 1 Ranaan Meyer: Being first in a category

8:45 - TEM 2 Pat Sheridan: "For Band, Chorus and Orchestral Winds"

9:58 - TEM 3 Gavin Chuck & Michael Clayville: Make art people couldn't live without

11:39 - TEM 4 Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser: Communication and persistence are cornerstones of success

13:44 - TEM 5 Jeff Nelsen: Fearless Performance as it relates to be an entrepreneur

15:44 - TEM 6 Brian Pertl: The perfect meld of artist and businessman

17:32 - TEM 7 Jeff Conner: Networking is a longterm process

19:13 - TEM 9 David Vining: His battle with dystonia taught him to not always approach problems in a linear and traditional manner

20:50 - TEM 10 Jonathan Kuuskoski: The importance of getting into the Build->Measure->Learn feedback loop as quickly as possible

22:37 - TEM 11 Jim Stephenson: The value of humility in a sustainable career

24:10 - TEM 13 Alan Baylock: Let them tell you no

27:01 - TEM 15 Mike Nickens: You do you and don't worry about fitting into a pre-existing mold

29:08 - TEM 17 Lance LaDuke: What else do you do?

31:06 - TEM 19 Ron Davis: Being fungible means you've already lost

33:29 - TEM 21 Max and Scott McKee: Surround yourself with the right people and anything is possible

34:25 - TEM 23 Michael Davis: Funded over 10 recordings through various creative ways

35:40 - TEM 25 Jennifer Rosenfeld and Julia Torgovitskaya: Why even in the worst case scenario you will learn a lot when starting a new venture

37:23 - TEM 27 John Kellogg: Why you need to define for yourself what your own definition of "making it" is

38:37 - TEM 29 Peter Seymour: Being willing to hear the word no literally thousands of times to get things moving

39:19 - TEM 32 Sam Pilafian: How having strengths where others have weaknesses will make you useful and hirable

40:30 - TEM 36 Michael Harley: Southern Exposure New Music Series has a very small yet incredibly dedicated niche

41:56 - TEM 38 Dan Gosling: The incredible ability to go from self-pity to launching your next plan overnight

44:03 - TEM 40 David Cutler: How impact and income are linked if you do it right

45:03 - TEM 42 Nate Zeisler: The importance of knowing your risk tolerance when plotting your career

46:55 - TEM 45 Drew McManus: How his Adaptistration blog not only solved problems for people but also created a community

48:10 - TEM 47 Mike Robinson: Going from the production line making drum heads to a job as the research and development coordinator in six months

49:53 - TEM 49 Ariel Hyatt: Evaluating ROI on social media is like try to monetize a cocktail party

51:32 - TEM 54 Hugh Sung: How they redesigned the AirTurn website a dozen times and paid attention to what worked and what didn't work with each version

53:20 - TEM 57 Lauren Pierce: - She learned how to code and was willing to email Wordpress support 10x a day until she understood everything

54:48 - TEM 59 Garrett Hope: The audacity of asking (including getting a Seth Godin talk onto his podcast)

56:33 - TEM 62 Jason Heath: The best time to start a podcast is five years ago and the second best time is today

58:04 - TEM 69 Seth Hanes: The importance of pitching people the right way (where they are getting at least 51% of the value of the exchange)

1:00:38 - TEM 71 Susan de Weger: Her time in IT helped her realize the importance of having a unique value proposition

1:03:00 - TEM 73 Jessica Meyer: The importance of intentionally networking/reaching out to people you don't know in an organized fashion

1:05:11 - TEM 79 Emilio Guarino: Why if you have no entrepreneurial experience, designing and selling a sticker for a project (like a band you're in) will teach you a lot about business

1:07:44 - TEM 83 John Beder: His use of deadlines to finally ship his documentary after years of making it

1:09:45 - TEM 85 Dana Fonteneau: Figuring out your why before deciding the tools to use and actually building stuff like websites

1:10:58 - TEM 87 Pete Meechan: Finding your niche (like he has with brass music)

1:12:43 - TEM 92 Steve Dillon: How his passion has helped him become an authority on certain subjects which in turn has helped him to solve problems for people

1:14:04 - TEM 95: Tim Topham How he built a community he could serve and then monetized it

1:16:58 - TEM 97 Mark Rabideau: His least favorite thing is a great idea that doesn't get executed

 

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes (I'm really close!) by leaving a rating and review.

Follow TEM on Instagram and Twitter

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo for Pedal Note Media

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